Essays sibling relationships in literature

Finally, the paternal framework present in a family has been shown to affect the relationship siblings have with each other. For example, growing up with both parents predicted more interactions among adult siblings, whereas those raised in singe parent families had significantly more diminished contact in later life (White & Riedmann, 1992). Poortman & Voorpostel's research results adversely show that siblings from divorced families more often have conflict-laden relationships in adulthood than do siblings from intact families. There were, however, no differences between siblings from divorced and intact families regarding the more positive aspects of their relationships (. relationship quality and contact frequency) (2009). It can then be hypothesized that a positive family atmosphere is likely to be related to warm sibling relationships, whereas a distressed atmosphere will probably be related to negative sibling relationships. In addition, Furman and Giberson (1995) suggested that conflicts with parents could increase the likelihood that children will be irritated and discharge their anger onto their siblings. Parents may influence their children's interpersonal relationships directly by giving advice and intervening in their interactions and disputes (McHale et al., 2000), or indirectly by modeling social behavior or regulating their children's emotions and behaviors (Parke & O'Neil, 1999). Previous research showed that children, whose relationships with parents were characterized by warmth, reported exhibiting less hostility and rivalry and more affection toward their siblings (Stocker & McHale, 1992). In contrast, parental assertion of power was related to a higher frequency of conflict between siblings (Furman & Giberson, 1995). Thus, contemporary demographic trends such as the rise in single-parent families and decrease in family size could be relevant to the solidarity and support of young and middle aged adults and should therefore be considered as contextually relevant to the study.

Family is said to be the foundation of the society because this is where the initial social order is patterned. Like the government, the power and authority is vested upon the ruler or leader. Likewise, in the family the bearer of power and authority is either the father or the mother (traditionally, the former is considered as the norm). Moreover, the children are the subordinates of their parents. However, the difference between the government in the family and the government in the society is that the former expressed more care and love rather than the latter.  The basic unit of the society, which is the family, is primarily composed of the father, mother and their children. There are two classification of a family, namely: immediate and extended family. The former refers to a classification of a family wherein the members are exclusively constituted of the fundamental members which are the father, mother and children. On the other hand the latter pertains to the family members who are either from the father’s side or the mother’s side (White & Klein, 2002). Need essay sample on "Parenting and Sibling Rivalry" ? We will write a custom essay sample specifically for you for only $/page

A young child cannot yet reason very well - bear in mind that he or she is just beginning to learn to speak. However, even at this young age, the child's EMOTIONAL feeling is well developed. In addition, what he or she feels is an intense DISLIKE for this new situation, and associates this disagreeable situation with the new baby. To complicate the child's frustration, this new situation goes on and on. Remember that, for a child, one day is a very long time, and a week may seem like an eternity. To make matters worse, this is happening just as the first-born is entering one of the most difficult and frustrating life-periods, for both the child and the parents, the so-called "terrible twos." Part of the problem is that the human mind tends to process emotional impulses before it processes conscious thoughts. Without knowing, the older child begins to look for ways to try to get the parents to "stop loving" the younger one. Later, the first-born will also begin to directly irritate and bother the younger child. When the parents become aware of this, they will reprimand and may punish the older child. However the problem continues. Punishing the older sibling simply makes him or her develop more discrete ways irritate the younger one that the parents will not be able to detect. In the beginning, the younger sibling is unaware of a problem in the family unit. The older child begins to feel increasingly threatened by the presence of another attention-getter in the household and begins to react by taking out their frustrations on the younger. At first, the younger child's capacity for action is rather limited. As the younger child begins to mature, he or she will begin developing ways to stop the older sibling's attacks. The easiest of these is to tattle. This makes the parent scold the older child and stops the attack - for the moment. The truth is that, from the beginning, the younger sibling has very little chance of winning in this fight. As he or she grows up, this continual losing against the older sibling is a source of great frustration for the younger child. This is one of the reasons why, to

Many kids have this eternal bond with their siblings and become almost like best friends. But some children aren’t so lucky. Although it is common for siblings to fight, constant bickering and envious feelings can show signs of a rivalry forming. It is a major concern for families, partly because siblings spend a good deal of time together and also because their fighting is aversive to parents. Often this rivalry starts even before the second child is born, and continues as each kid grows and competes with each other with everything from toys to attention. As kids continue to develop and reach different developmental stages in their growth process, their ever-changing needs can drastically affect how they relate to one another.
Most brothers and sisters experience some degree of competition or jealousy. Each child is constantly battling and competing to define who they are as an individual. On this journey of discovery, they try to find their talents, activities, and interests to show that they are separate from their siblings.
Comparing children, though seeming to be a motivational tool, is only pushing one child to feel resentment towards the other. When the comparisons start to become riddled with judgement and evaluation, this can make a child either feel superior or inferior to their sibling. When pitting siblings against each other a person could overlook certain achievements one child has made because the focus is on the other. Jealousy can arise if children feel they are getting unequal amounts of their parents attention, discipline, and responsiveness. Children may also feel their relationship with their parents is threatened by the arrival of a new baby. Jealousy can be considered as an ‘interpersonal system’. Three relationships are included within the system: (1) the relationship between the jealous individual and the beloved, (2) the relationship between the beloved and the rival, and (3) the relationship between ...

On the one hand, sibling rivalry can be beneficial for children by boosting their emotional development and reinforcing their social skills. Based on five-year research which examined children's cognitive and social development between the ages of two and six, Dr Claire Hughes has point out that the more the children upset each other, the more they learn about regulating their emotions and how they can affect the emotions of others. Thus, sibling rivalry is really a safe environment where children can learn to deal with negative emotions such as jealousy. Besides, sibling rivalry also improves problem-solving skills. Children spend a lot of time playing together; they argue, tease, fight each others, and then try to compromise. After resolving the disagreements, children can gain a lot of useful lessons about negotiation. Furthermore, there are a number of others valued skills kids can learn from competition such as positive engagement, conflict management and communication.

Essays sibling relationships in literature

essays sibling relationships in literature

Many kids have this eternal bond with their siblings and become almost like best friends. But some children aren’t so lucky. Although it is common for siblings to fight, constant bickering and envious feelings can show signs of a rivalry forming. It is a major concern for families, partly because siblings spend a good deal of time together and also because their fighting is aversive to parents. Often this rivalry starts even before the second child is born, and continues as each kid grows and competes with each other with everything from toys to attention. As kids continue to develop and reach different developmental stages in their growth process, their ever-changing needs can drastically affect how they relate to one another.
Most brothers and sisters experience some degree of competition or jealousy. Each child is constantly battling and competing to define who they are as an individual. On this journey of discovery, they try to find their talents, activities, and interests to show that they are separate from their siblings.
Comparing children, though seeming to be a motivational tool, is only pushing one child to feel resentment towards the other. When the comparisons start to become riddled with judgement and evaluation, this can make a child either feel superior or inferior to their sibling. When pitting siblings against each other a person could overlook certain achievements one child has made because the focus is on the other. Jealousy can arise if children feel they are getting unequal amounts of their parents attention, discipline, and responsiveness. Children may also feel their relationship with their parents is threatened by the arrival of a new baby. Jealousy can be considered as an ‘interpersonal system’. Three relationships are included within the system: (1) the relationship between the jealous individual and the beloved, (2) the relationship between the beloved and the rival, and (3) the relationship between ...

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