Endnotes in research paper

Proper citation of sources is necessary to give credit to the authors whose work informed yours, to point readers to the sources you used, and to show the breadth of your research. Though endnotes are less commonly used in student or academic papers than in-line citations or footnotes, they are quite common in books, where they make for a cleaner page. The basics of endnotes are always the same – numbered notes within the text refer to numbered entries in a notes section at the end of the document – but there are minor differences depending on whether you use Chicago or MLA (Modern Language Association) style.

When using footnotes and using endnotes, use care to format them properly. The specific formatting depends on the official style guide you are required to follow. Think critically about every piece of information for which you use these types of notes. For supplemental information, ask yourself if the information is disruptive or not closely related enough to keep it in the body of the text or if the information is vital enough to put directly in the text. When you are not sure, include the information in the text. As with anything, the overuse of footnotes or endnotes hurts the strength of your paper.

Sometimes you may be asked to include these -- especially if you have used a parenthetical style of citation. A "works cited" page is a list of all the works from which you have borrowed material. Your reader may find this more convenient than footnotes or endnotes because he or she will not have to wade through all of the comments and other information in order to see the sources from which you drew your material. A "works consulted" page is a complement to a "works cited" page, listing all of the works you used, whether they were useful or not.

Endnotes in research paper

endnotes in research paper

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